A COMPRIHENSIVE DICTIONARY OF TEXTILE


image

by  : Mason Brown

Textiles are fibres that are spun into yarn or made into fabric by weaving, knitting, braiding, and felting. The term is now applicable to natural and synthetic filaments, yarns, and threads as well as to the woven, knitted, felted, tufted, braided, bonded, knotted, and embroidered fabrics. The spinning and weaving were one of the first crafts that is believed to have been practiced as early as the New Stone Age. In ancient Egypt, the earliest textiles were woven from flax in India, Peru, and Cambodia, from cotton in the Southern European; from wool in China.

Textile also includes non-woven fabrics produced by mechanically or chemically bonding fibres. Computerised textile mill with multiple machines run continuously to produce textiles in the modern market. In a mill, the initial stage of processing fibre into fabric is almost entirely coordinated and controlled by computer. Computers are able to execute complex weaving and spinning jobs with great speed and accuracy. Most are equipped with monitoring sensors that will stop production if an error is detected.

The initial stage of textile manufacturing involves the production of the raw material either by farmers who raise cotton, sheep, silkworms, or flax or by chemists who produce fibre from various basic substances by chemical processes. The fibre is spun into yarn, which is then processed into fabric in a weaving or knitting mill. After dyeing and finishing, the woven material is ready for delivery either directly to a manufacturer of textile products to finally get stitched into clothes that we wear.

This book gives you an insight for terminology used in the textile industry. It should be helpful for everyone who is associated with garment, and textile industry.

To download this book please click on the following link.

http://www.4shared.com/office/SGs4M_TZce/2010_A_Comprehensive_Dictionar.html

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s