Industrial Revolution – Timeline of Textile Machinery


Several inventions in textile machinery occurred in a relatively short time period during the industrial revolution.

  • 1733 Flying shuttle invented by John Kay – an improvement to looms that enabled weavers to weave faster.
  • 1742 Cotton mills were first opened in England.
  • 1764 Spinning jenny invented by James Hargreaves – the first machine to improve upon the spinning wheel.
  • 1764 Water frame invented by Richard Arkwright – the first powered textile machine.
  • 1769Arkwright patented the water frame.
  • 1770Hargreaves patented the Spinning Jenny.
  • 1773The first all-cotton textiles were produced in factories.
  • 1779Crompton invented the spinning mule that allowed for greater control over the weaving process
  • 1785Cartwright patented the power loom. It was improved upon by William Horrocks, known for his invention of the variable speed batton in 1813.
  • 1787Cotton goods production had increased 10 fold since 1770.
  • 1789 Samuel Slater brought textile machinery design to the US.
  • 1790Arkwright built the first steam powered textile factory in Nottingham, England.
  • 1792Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin – a machine that automated the separation of cottonseed from the short-staple cotton fiber.
  • 1804 Joseph Marie Jacquard invented the Jacquard Loom that weaved complex designs. Jacquard invented a way of automatically controlling the warp and weft threads on a silk loom by recording patterns of holes in a string of cards*.
  • 1813 William Horrocks invented the variable speed batton (for an improved power loom).
  • 1856William Perkin invented the first synthetic dye.
Advertisements

One thought on “Industrial Revolution – Timeline of Textile Machinery

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s